AllMusic's Scores

  • Music
For 13,440 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Discovery
Lowest review score: 20 Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark
Score distribution:
13440 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wasteland is another example of Uncle Acid's genius, and more evidence that they are the best metal band (apart from Black Sabbath) of the early '70s.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's quaint yet enjoyable but doesn't deliver the same power or joie de vivre of its far more boisterous predecessor.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Quavo Huncho is enjoyable but unmemorable. It's not quite a Migos album, but it comes close enough to tide fans over until album number four.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Wwhile it's hard to argue that Evolution lives up to its moniker, the familiarity of the architecture is lent considerable gravitas by the overall execution, which as per usual, leaves nothing but perspiration in its wake.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lyrics like the closer's "No more listening today" and "No one left here today" may apply to some returning fans, but the invigorated approach to production, arrangements, and, in many cases, performances makes for a still highly listenable set that's at least as likely to excite as to challenge.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Flourishes, along with Kelly's sharply honed wit, keep the otherwise moody and slow Dying Star from seeming somnolent, and they're enough to help steer attention away from the album's appealing nocturnal sheen and to the songcraft, which is sturdy and enduring.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Estelle's creative energy is manifest here, so much so that the constant rotation of featured guests becomes a distraction.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its six anthems burn with Ilunga's desire to prove himself, and the years he spent refining Noirwave paid off: His vision of a proud pan-African culture is in clearer focus and more relevant than ever.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The fascinating thing about Loving the Alien is how it makes this period seem more interesting than the individual albums, and that's entirely due to the dance mixes, ephemera, and awkward live material. On these byways, it's possible to hear Bowie grapple with both his past and present in a hungry fashion and that desperation is alien to Bowie, so an immersion into this unease makes for compelling listening.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hiatt's band (Yates McKendree on guitar, Patrick O'Hearn on bass, Kenneth Blevins on drums, Kevin McKendree on keys) lays a lean but eloquent groove behind his performances, and the audio is rich and clear. One hopes for his sake that John Hiatt's life is happier than The Eclipse Sessions may suggest, but either way he's given us a dark night of the soul that's compelling and beautifully crafted.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Origami Harvest may not work for everybody, but for those who take the time to explore the unexpected bends and folds in Akinmusire's construction, a wealth of discoveries can be found.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Created in a time of turmoil, Fighting Season is an album that always reflects the era that informed it, and while Thalia Zedek never pretends to have all the answers, her musings are brave, literate, and full of heart, and this is an important statement from an important artist.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Magick Songs provides a genuine journey, and that propulsion is enough to power JEFF the Brotherhood through the moments when they indulge in hazy pastiche, assembling a washed-out watercolor version of '70s sci-fi that was already a faded memory by the time of their birth.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At 67, Graham Parker isn't as angry or young as he once was, but he remains an estimable talent, and he's reveling in the pleasure of making music on Cloud Symbols. You may well feel the same way when you listen.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Frustrated, hungry, and full of rage, The Atlas Underground is a rallying cry set against an inventive and propulsive backdrop that inspires a physical response as much as thoughtful action.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Look Now is the work of a man with enough talent to take his muse in any direction he pleases and give us something memorable.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A collection of songs and finds Grant at his loosest, funniest, and most heartbreaking.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Very much a product of their time, Brockhampton absorbs what they need from across genres, sharing honest confessions from their varied personal backgrounds (the most striking provided by group leader Kevin Abstract) and reflecting its mixed audience as a voice of their generation. Brockhampton have seized upon this defining moment with Iridescence, a defining peak in their young career.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Bunny seems more like an album to mentally pick apart than dance to, yet it's not hard to lose one's self in the rush of Dear's inventive rhythms.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Jassbusters has enough chops to pull off the kind of slick 70's MOR soft rock that seems to be Mockasin's bailiwick, but as a whole, there's just not a lot to these songs to keep things consistently interesting, and the album comes off as more of an indulgent lark in Mockasin's growing canon.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    ATW
    If anything, ATW feels like a product of pure instinct, and while it may take some patience to absorb, there isn't a single note that feels coerced.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Overall, Reduxer is as pleasantly surprising as it is satisfying, offering an exciting counterpart for fans of Relaxer, while providing 11 fresh reasons to appreciate the original incarnations for those who might be less familiar.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Coleman absorbs and converts all the energy into something else: a joyous act of opposition to unacknowledged tyranny.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Making the most of the various environments where it was recorded, the album feels like a travel diary picked up sporadically along the way. Some entries expand on every thought and some are left half-finished, but these contrasting moods reflect the peaks and valleys of Vile's journey, both literal and metaphorical, in getting to this chapter of his music.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For those who aren't put off by its favoring crafted texture and melody over mood or structure, it's also absorbing, offering layers to uncover with repeat listens. Trivia of note: Perfect Shapes is Wasner's first time producing music that isn't her own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They've made a classic pop record that deserves play by anyone who recognizes that songs don't need to make the most noise or be the shiniest new thing to have an impact in the emotional life of the listener. Sometimes gentle and calm gets the job done, and that is definitely the case here.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In a way, with all its emphasis on over-achievement and a continuous supply of re-recounted autobiographical content, YSIV can be as mind-numbing as the mumble rap Logic rails against, but the proficiency and fervor are indisputable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Although Trench requires a few spins to really register, it's ultimately rewarding and fully immersive, delivering a depth and gravity at which Twenty One Pilots only hinted on Blurryface.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Taken as a reaction to toxic politics, a relentlessly discouraging news cycle, and generally raw emotions, Vitriola is a beautiful slice of wild anger. While it can feel relentless at times, these songs find Kasher and his bandmates swinging at anything that moves with all the passion and power of their best albums.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    WAX
    Here, Tunstall has rekindled the fire with one of her tightest and most inspirational records to date.